Fall 2022

HEBREW

  • HEBR 1010 | Introduction to Modern Hebrew 1 | Zvi Gilboa | MTuWThF 10:00am–10:50am | New Cabell Hall 309
     
  • HEBR 2010 | Intermediate Modern Hebrew | Zvi Gilboa | MTuWThF 9:00am–9:50am | New Cabell Hall 111
     
  • HEBR 2410 | Intermediate Biblical Hebrew 1 | Jessica Andruss | TuTh 11:00am–12:15pm | New Cabell Hall 183
    • In this course, which continues and builds upon HEBR/RELJ 1420, students will develop facility in the reading, comprehension, and translation of biblical Hebrew. Students will review basic grammar, learn to analyze syntax, and build their working vocabulary. As a secondary objective of the course, students will learn to interpret biblical prose. By the end of the course, students will be able to read and translate from Hebrew to English moderately difficult prose passages.
    • This course is cross-listed as RELJ 2410.​
       
  • HEBR 3010 | Advanced Modern Hebrew 1 | Zvi Gilboa | TuTh 12:30pm–1:45pm 

HISTORY

  • HIME1501 | Israel/Palestine Through Literature and Film | Caroline Kahlenberg | W 3:30pm–6pm | Bryan Hall 334
    • In this introductory history seminar, we will approach the history of the Israeli-Palestinian struggle through the lens of literature and film. We will study memoirs, short stories, documentaries, and feature films in order to think about several broader historical themes, including: the relationship between religion and nationalism, the role of colonialism in the Middle East, the links between history and memory, and the meaning of homeland. 
       
  • HIME2559 | Modern History of Palestine/Israel | Caroline Kahlenberg | TuTh 12:30pm–1:45pm | Shannon House 111
    • In this course, we will survey the history of modern Palestine/Israel. Part I focuses on Ottoman Palestine, early Zionist settlement, British conquest, and the Holocaust in Europe. Part II focuses on the 1948 War, known as the Israeli "War of Independence" and the Palestinian "Nakba" (Catastrophe). Part III addresses the Palestinian refugee crisis, the rise of Palestinian resistance movements, continued wars between Israel and Arab states, and Israeli-Arab peace initiatives. 

RELIGIOUS STUDIES 

  • RELC 3620 Modern Theology | Christianity, Nazism, Holocaust | Victoria Barnett | M 2:00pm–4:30pm | Shannon House 111 
    • This seminar will examine the wide range of Christian theological responses during the 1930s and 1940s to Nazism, the Second World War and the Holocaust. This will include theological and activist reactions from religious communities and leaders in Nazi Germany, the Vatican, the Protestant ecumenical movement, the interreligious movement, and American denominations, including the Black Church. Particular attention will be given to theological turning points and their legacies after 1945.
       
  • RELG 2820 | Jerusalem | Jessica Andruss | TuTh 2:00pm–3:15pm | New Cabell Hall 389 
    • This course traces the history of Jerusalem with a focus on its significance in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. How have these communities experienced and inhabited Jerusalem? How have they imagined the city and interpreted its meaning? How have Jews, Christians, and Muslims expressed their attachments to this contested space from antiquity to modern times? Our exploration will be rooted in primary texts—literary and documentary sources and visual images—and informed by historical and cultural context as well as scholarly approaches to sacred space.
       
  • RELJ 2031 | Introduction to Jewish Life in America | Vanessa Ochs | TuTh 9:00am–10:45am | Nau Hall 141
    • This class is an introduction to Jewish Life in America in its religious and cultural manifestations. Students will become familiar with Jewish texts, holidays, rituals, lifecycle events, philosophical issues, communities and cultural practices as they are encountered NOW.
       
  • RELJ 2410 | Intermediate Biblical Hebrew I | Jessica Andruss | TuTh 11:00am–12:15pm | New Cabell Hall 183
    • In this course, which continues and builds upon HEBR/RELJ 1420, students will develop facility in the reading, comprehension, and translation of biblical Hebrew. Students will review basic grammar, learn to analyze syntax, and build their working vocabulary. As a secondary objective of the course, students will learn to interpret biblical prose. By the end of the course, students will be able to read and translate from Hebrew to English moderately difficult prose passages.
    • This course is cross-listed as HEBR 2410.
       
  • RELJ 3052 | Responses to the Holocaust | Jennifer Geddes | Th 2:00pm–4:30pm | Nau Hall 142
    • In this course, we read a wide range of responses to the Holocaust—historical accounts, survivor testimonies, theological responses, and philosophical works. The following questions will guide our discussions: What are the theological and philosophical implications of the Holocaust? After the Holocaust, how have understandings of human nature, religious belief and practice, good and evil, responsibility and ethical action changed? What responses to the Holocaust are possible, important, and/or necessary now?
  • RELJ 3170 | Modern Jewish Thought | Asher Biemann | TuTh 11:00am–12:15pm | Gibson Hall 141
     
  • RELJ 3320 | Judaism: Medicine and Healing | Vanessa Ochs | W 3:30pm–6:00pm | Kerchof Hall 317
    • Jewish tradition integrates a respect for the skill and knowledge of the physician along with an awareness that there are spiritual and relational components of the healing process. In this course we will study: multiple Jewish ways of understanding why we get sick, suffer, heal and find meaning again; Jewish healing practices (ancient and contemporary) in ritual and prayer; and specific Jewish medical-ethical perspectives concerning the body and healing. Readings will include ancient sacred writings in Torah, Mishna and Talmud as well as modern and contemporary texts (serving as case studies) that reflect how medicine, suffering and healing are variously constructed and reflected in Jewish culture.  This course will stress close readings of texts, analyses of living traditions, and encounters with those whose lives and experiences are perfused by Jewish models of healing.